This is me trying to write a very concise autobiography. So, if you’d like to learn something about me, simply continue to read. If you’d like to get in touch to share wisdom and / or jokes, then click on the following links. Now, this is my first EIRE+ALBA blog, the second one you can find HERE. If you’ve got something to say about my writing in here about wrestling, writing and things in between, please go ahead and use the commentary section. I’m always open to other free minds. And now enjoy!


I’m a 38 year old historian, writer, photographer, German by birth but Irish by heart. When eating outside I test Irish coffee. Important football matches I can only watch alone. Collect DVD’s, football shirts and balls. My own sport activities include football, table tennis and mini golf.

When it was back in 1977 — the best year in history — not only Meryl Streep gave her screen debut in The Deadliest Season and the most famous music albums were released — as Animals from Pink Floyd, Peter Gabriel from Peter Gabriel (obviously!), Even in the Quietest Moments from Supertramp and Bat Out of Hell from Meat Loaf — it was also the year when I was born.

It was in the thick of the Cold War but my home was always warm and friendly.

In the first three years of my life I lived with my parents in a tiny flat on the south periphery of Dresden, then GDR, now Germany. The most disgusting thing back in time was the yoghurt that was (sometimes) available in Konsum, the only shop where you could buy something for the daily living. There were just two sorts of yoghurt: one was disgusting, the other even more disgusting. So much more fun (and perhaps healthier) was eating gum giraffes.

Another funny item was the heavy black swivel chair of my parents. They thought it was good to put the little one innit because of its heaviness. But once somehow I managed to push it over — together with myself — and rattled my head against the oven. I don’t really know what happened to the chair afterwards. Or with me. But I think all four following pictures were taken before the accident.

In some ways I think that I spent my remaining Dresden time in this cell (don’t be confused by my happiness: it was hell!):

I can’t remember anything about my early life in Dresden. Actually, anything is a blurry darkness until I was six years of age. I almost envy all people who are able to remember some moments in their life when they were three years old or younger. Maybe me hitting my head for a couple of times brought the loss of memory. But anyway, as you can clearly see in those next two pictures, I already trained myself for the perfect evil look. It probably wasn’t intentional here, just the bright sun causing me narrowing my eyes. But to this very day, I can’t stand the bright sun – or any sun at all – any brightness. I love the dark and the night.

My zodiac sign is Leo, so I’m absolutely a cat guy. I can’t stand those little – so-called – dogs that are basically ugly rats with strange faces. But cats are great because they are like me: they do what they want and they are best on their own. I also like sheep but I’m no-one for following other people; I rather make people follow me – but I don’t intend to do so. People are free to like what I do or don’t like it. Like I said, I don’t run after people. It’s just a waste of time. You can do so much more with and in your life if you listen to yourself, go after what you are good at, perfect it, throw as much out as possible and success will follow you. It takes some time if you’re doing what you really love on your own. But at least, you’re staying true to yourself.

When people get to know that I grew up in ex GDR for the first twelve years of my life, they usually start to feel sorry for me. And there were certainly a lot of bad and evil things that it’s great that GDR and it’s system ceased to be, especially when – like my family – you’ve had relatives outside of GDR and you weren’t a supporter of the system. We also had spies of the State Security watching for us but none of my family experienced prison. Parts of the State Security were well organized and did a lot of inhuman stuff but there were other parts that were simply ridiculous – like spies in coats, hats and sunglasses standing on streets during warm summer days (you always knew who they were). And if there was nothing suspicious going on in your life, your personal spies just made up ridiculous stuff, like my mum apparently got a care packet every week from the post office that she carried home in a baby carriage. And, of course, we weren’t allowed to travel beyond the Iron Curtain (until 1990 my farthest ever holiday was to the small island of Hiddensee).

But there were also good things about the GDR. Because most people didn’t really care or took seriously the government, the economic system – especially in the rural parts of GDR – was basically based on barter and some McGyver philosophy. You took what you were able to get and you used stuff for things they weren’t constructed for in the first place. You needed great amounts of fantasy to get the simplest things done. You had to deal with less to make the most. You didn’t throw away stuff as easily like people do today. Because maybe you needed something later for something you didn’t already imagine. People also seemed to have a sixth sense for smelling where they could get some certain stuff from. When there was a queue in front of a shop somewhere, people would line up without knowing what exactly the shop had to offer. Basically: the daily life in GDR was full of surprises any creativity.

And there was something that foreshadowed or inspired my future: the only GDR comic Mosaik. Created first by Hannes Hegen as the Digedags, there were three guys who traveled around the world through different times to help the people they met with wisdom and wit. From 1976, the Mosaik was recreated, now with the Abrafaxe as protagonists. But the concept almost stayed the same. The three guys now were smaller and the background drawings were more realistic and detailed. Early on, I first got to know the Abrafaxe and their travels through ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Near East. To this day, this is the time and place where my interest for history is mostly placed.

As long as I’m able to remember I always loved the snow. I like to wear scarfs and hats and walking around outside in the snow for hours. As a kid, I used to ski on a small hill behind our house. Winters in late 1970s, early 1980s also had a lot of snow days, so it was easier to get used to the white stuff.

Now, this is one of the few pictures of myself during my time in GDR that exists in colour. This happened because one of my uncles owned such a camera and was in Dresden for a visit. This rotten street you can see there is the street we lived in during my first three years of living. Also in the picture: a white Trabant, called Trab(b)i, from behind. This basic GDR car only existed in three colours, light green, brown/yellow/ocre, light blue and this white. You didn’t just go and buy one. You had to order them. And I can remember that we were standing in line around 1988 to order one Trabbi for me, so I would get one when I turn 18. Remember that I was only eleven years of age by the time we ordered one of those precious cars, so you’ve got an idea of how long it took to get your hands on one of them.

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6 thoughts on “About

  1. Hello Seamus, I am making the rounds thanking bloggers for following my blog. Etiquette I think, like old-fashioned calling cards. So how could I skip you? Here’s the standard:

    “Thanks for following my blog! I look forward to keeping up with your work, as well!”

    But for you, I also need a personal thank you. So, Seamus, thank you for following my blog, reading my poems, encouraging my writing, and just for being such an engaging, interesting man.

    Like

    1. Cheers, Kay, very lovely from you to do such a nice thing. And it certainly encourages me to read more on your blog. At the moment (to be honest from today on) I try to write regularly on my novel (which will be a 1,000 pages monster when it’s complete, I’m sure!). Re-starting to write isn’t the best I can do so that needs time even if I only write 500 words per day on it. So, when I’m really into it and don’t need 3hrs for the 500 words (like today) I’ll definitely read more of your work. Promised!

      Like

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